Sri Lanka’s Top 31 Endemic Birds | Part 02

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Sri Lanka’s Top 31 Endemic Birds | Part 01

Finch Bird sri lanka endemic birds

There are about 31 endemic birds existing in Sri Lanka, and Sri Lanka’s Top 31 Endemic Birds | Part 01 – Wild Lanka, has already provided you with descriptive information on the following 18 endemic birds in Sri Lanka.

01. Ceylon Spurfowl-(Galloperdix Bicalcarata)

02. Ceylon Junglefowl-(Gallus Lafayettii) 

03. Ceylon Woodpigeon-(Columba Torringtonii)

04. Ceylon Green Pigeon-(Treron Pompadora)

05. Ceylon Hanging-parrot-(Loriculus Beryllinus)

06. Layard’s Parakeet-(Psittacula Calthropae)

07. Green-Billed Coucal-(Centropus Chlororhynchos)

08. Red-faced Malkoha-(Phaenicophaeus Pyrrhocephalus)

09. Serendib Scops owl (Otus Thilohoffmanni)

10. Chestnut Backed Owlet-(Glaucidium Castanonotum)

11. Ceylon Grey Hornbill-(Ocyceros Gingalensis)

12. Yellow-Fronted Barbet-(Megalaima flavifrons)

13. Ceylon Small Barbet-(Megalaima Rubricapillus)

14. Crimson-backed Flameback-(Chrysocolaptes Stricklandi)

15. Ceylon Swallow-(Hirundo Hyperythra)

16. Ceylon Woodshrike-(Tephrodornis Affinis)

17. Black-Capped Bulbul-(Pycnonotus Melanicterus

18. Yellow-Eared Bulbul-(Pycnonotus penicillatus)


19. Spot-Winged Ground-Thrush-(Zoothera Spiloptera) Blyth, 1847

Family: Turdidae

How can you identify them?

The Thrush is a bird with rich olive brown upperparts, two rows of dots on the median coverts, and a striking black and white facial pattern. They can be found in forests and well-wooded gardens near these areas.

Where can you see them ?

  • Sinharaja Forest Reserve
  • Dombagaskanda
  • Kitulgala
Spot-Winged Ground-Thrush - Zoothera Spiloptera, endemic birds of sri lanka
Spot-Winged Ground-Thrush – Zoothera Spiloptera

20. Ceylon Scaly Thrush-(Zoothera Imbricata) Layard, 1854

Family: Turdidae

How can you identify them?

The Ceylon Scaly Thrush is another endemic bird included in the list of endemic birds of Sri Lanka. The silent olive-brown upperparts and rufous buff underparts of this woodland ground thrush are silent. The scaly texture of the body, the broad and lengthy beak, and the bulky appearance make identification easier.

Where can you see them ?

  • The lower hills and elevations of up to 1700 m.
Ceylon Scaly Thrush - Zoothera Imbricata
Ceylon Scaly Thrush – Zoothera Imbricata

21. Ceylon Whistling-Thrush-(Myophonus Blighi) Holdsworth, 1872

Family: Turdudae

How can you identify them?

The Ceylon Whistling-Thrush, with its black beak and legs, is a rare bird found only above 1200 m in elevation. They prefer environments near rivers and ponds.

Where can you see them ?

  • Horton Plains National Park
Ceylon Whistling-Thrush - Myophonus Blighi
Ceylon Whistling-Thrush – Myophonus Blighi

22. Dusky-Blue Flycatcher-(Eumyias Sordidus) Walden, 1870

Family: Muscicapidae

How can you identify them?

Another endemic bird of Sri Lanka is the Dusky-Blue Flycatcher, which has a lovely drab blue tint.

Where can you see them ?

They can be found on slopes over 650 m in elevation and are seldom seen below 1000 m in woodlands, well-wooded areas, and gardens.

Dusky-Blue Flycatcher - Eumyias Sordidus
Dusky-Blue Flycatcher – Eumyias Sordidus

23. Ashy-headed Laughing Thrush-(Garrulax Cinereifrons) Blyth , 1851

Family: Timaliidae

How can you identify them?

Ashy-headed The Laughing Thrush is limited to the deep forests and nearby hills of the rainy zone. They can be found at least 1600 m in height. They are noisy birds, always chattering and squeaking. The rufous babbler’s calls are commonly mistaken for these.

Where can you see them ?

  • Sinharaja Forest Reserve
Ashy-headed Laughing Thrush-Garrulax Cinereifrons
Ashy-headed Laughing Thrush-Garrulax Cinereifrons

24. Brown-Capped Babbler-(Pellorneum Fuscocapillus) Blyth, 1849

Family: Timaliidae

How can you identify them?

The Brown-Capped Babbler’s upper body is brown, with a deeper brown helmet and neck; the face, supercilium, and under parts are cinnamon or somewhat rusty. They can be found up to at least 1600 m in elevation.

Where can you see them ?

  • They can be found all around Sri Lanka.
Brown-Capped Babbler - Pellorneum Fuscocapillus
Brown-Capped Babbler – Pellorneum Fuscocapillus

25. Ceylon Scimitar-Babbler-(Pomatorhinus Melanurus) Blyth, 1847

Family: Timaliidae

How can you identify them?

The Ceylon Scimitar-Babbler is a wonderful slender babbler with a long yellow downcurved bill, a long white brow that continues across the neck, and a black eye stripe that is extremely loud and attractive. They prefer to live in estates and well-wooded gardens rather than forests, and they can be seen as couples or families.

Ceylon Scimitar-Babbler - Pomatorhinus Melanurus
Ceylon Scimitar-Babbler – Pomatorhinus Melanurus

26. Ceylon Rufous Babbler-(Turdoides Rufescens) Blyth , 1847

Family: Timaliidae

How can you identify them?

The Ceylon Rufous Babbler distinguishes itself from other babblers due to having a rufous color and a striking orange beak and legs. It may be found in the rain forests as well as the hillside areas. They can be seen as small groups.

Where can you see them ?

  • Sinharaja Forest Reserve
Ceylon Rufous Babbler-Turdoides Rufescens
Ceylon Rufous Babbler-Turdoides Rufescens

27. Ceylon Bush-Warbler-(Elaphrornis palliseri) Blyth, 1851

How can you identify them?

The Ceylon Bush-Warbler is only found above 1500 m in the forests. They are dark in color throughout, with a rusty-buff neck, a dark grey breast, and a rounded tail. Males have red eyes, while females have light brown eyes.

Where can you see them ?

  • Nuwara Eliya
  • Horton Plains National Park
Ceylon Bush-Warbler - Elaphrornis Palliseri
Ceylon Bush-Warbler – Elaphrornis Palliseri

28. Legge’s Flowerpecker-(Dicaeum Vincens) Sclater, 1872

Family: Dicaeidae

How can you identify them?

The Legge’s Flowerpecker is extremely attractive. It is distinguished from the similarly named purple-rumped sunbird by its short, strong beak. Males have a dark blue-grey top and white tips on the outer tail feathers, and females have a white neck and upper breast. They can be seen as individuals, pairs, or small groupings.

Where can you see them ?

Legge’s Flowerpecker is only found in the rain forests of the wet zone’s southwestern, as well as nearby hills reaching 1000 m in height.

Legge’s Flowerpecker - Dicaeum Vincens
Legge’s Flowerpecker – Dicaeum Vincens

29. Ceylon White-Eye-(Zosterops Ceylonensis) Holdsworth, 1872

Family: Zosteropidae

How can you identify them?

The Ceylon White-Eye is another endemic that may be found at just around 1000 m elevation, where it may be the most common bird. They are slightly larger and have a more vibrant jungle green plumage than the similarly sized oriental white-eared. The white eye ring has been shattered more severely in the front than the oriental white eye ring. 

Where can you see them ?

  • Nuwara Eliya
  • Horton Plains National Park
Ceylon White-Eye - Zosterops Ceylonensis
Ceylon White-Eye – Zosterops Ceylonensis

30. White-faced Starling-(Sturnia Albofrontata) Layard, 1854

How can you identify them?

The white-faced starling’s white of the head merges streakily into the black of the back, wings, and tail, while the white neck blends into the smoky grey of the breast and streaked underparts. It is confined to the tall woodlands and nearby parts of the wet zone, reaching a height of roughly 1500 m. They can be seen as pairs or small groups.

Where can you see them ?

  • Sinharaja Forest Reserve
White-faced Starling - Sturnia Albofrontata
White-faced Starling – Sturnia Albofrontata

31. Ceylon Hill-Myna-(Gracula Ptilogenys) Blyth, 1846

Family: Sturnidae

How can you identify them?

The Ceylon Hill-Myna is distinguished from the southern hill myna by the presence of only one pair of wattles (the only other Sri Lankan bird with which it may be mistaken). This myna inhabits the wet zone’s forests and well-forested terrain, reaching heights of at least 2000 m in elevation. They live in groups of two or three people.

Ceylon Hill-Myna - Gracula Ptilogenys
Ceylon Hill-Myna – Gracula Ptilogenys

32. Ceylon Crested Drongo-(Dicrurus Lophorinus) Viellot, 1817

Family: Dicruridae

How can you identify them?

The Ceylon Crested Drongo is easily identified by its frontal crest, glossy black plumage, and long, deeply forked tail devoid of rackets. A very vocal mimic who impersonates a variety of birds. They can be seen to reach heights of at least 1600 m.

Where can you see them ?

  • Sinharaja Forest Reserve
Ceylon Crested Drongo - Dicrurus Lophorinus
Ceylon Crested Drongo – Dicrurus Lophorinus

33. Ceylon Blue Magpie-(Urocissa Ornate) Wagler, 1829

Family: Corvidae

How can you identify them?

The Ceylon Blue Magpie is, without a doubt, one of Sri Lanka’s most beautiful endemics. The primary hue is brilliant blue, with a red beak, eye ring, and legs; a chestnut head and neck; and a long graduated blue tail with a black and, finally, a white tip. They can be seen as small family groups of up to six or seven individuals.

Ceylon Blue Magpie - Urocissa Ornate
Ceylon Blue Magpie-Urocissa Ornata

References:


Read more:

The 10 biggest birds in the world – Wild Lanka

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